Autos

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

There are so many hundreds of car companies that have gone belly-up over the years. More popular and noticeable brands like Pontiac, Plymouth, Mercury, Saab, Oldsmobile, and Hummer, are well known to us these days. But others like Packard, Studebaker, DeSoto, Hudson, International Harvester, and others, were huge in the earlier 20th century.

Most brands have built pickup trucks at one time or another, even if they weren’t as popular as, say, the Ford F-Series. Then again, no car is as popular as the F-Series. But even before WWII (and especially after, when trucks became more popular), cars were often converted into pickup trucks and were able to stand on their own.

These days, pickups are one of the most popular market segments in the auto industry. But let’s take a look at 15 pickups from defunct car brands—trucks that you might have never even heard of before.

15. 1946-1968 Mercury M Series

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via The Transmission

The Mercury M Series was a series of pickups that was marketed by Ford’s Mercury division, from 1946 to 1968. It was primarily sold in Canada as a rebadged Ford F Series. The full-size truck differed greatly in exterior trim to the Ford F-Series counterpart. The Ford Econoline van was also sold as a pickup from 1961 to 1967. Mercury went belly-up in 2011, after being founded by Edsel Ford in 1938.

14. 1957-1959 Meteor Ranchero

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via OnAllCylinders

Here’s another rebadged car found in Canada primarily, the Meteor Ranchero. You probably guessed that it’s pretty much a Ford Ranchero, but with a different nameplate. The Canadian-built car-pickup was added to the lineup in 1957 and was produced as the Meteor Ranchero until 1959. These are pretty rare trucks these days—much rarer than the Ford version—since they were produced for such a short time.

13. 1936-1939 Oldsmobile Truck

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Pinterest

Oldsmobile is another car company that you don’t think “pickup truck” when you hear. You think, “That’s the car my granddad drove.” But from 1936 to 1939, Oldsmobile did indeed have a pickup truck, mostly found in the UK and Australia. The truck resembled GMC and Chevy trucks of those years, though they were a bit taller and with door windows that were more arched. Oldsmobile lasted 122 years, from 1897 to 2004.

12. 1960-1967 Fargo D-100

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Pinterest

The Fargo Motor Car Company developed a brand of truck originally in 1913, that was then dropped in 1922. Chrysler bought the business in 1928 and created their own line of Fargo trucks that were discontinued in the 1930s. Dodge trucks were also offered as Fargo or DeSoto trucks in most of Latin America at one point, and the Fargo D-100, D-400, and DP-400 Diesel trucks were built from 1960 to 1967 in Argentina.

11. 2009-2010 Hummer H3T

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via The Fast Lane Truck

Did you know that Hummer built a pickup truck? And yes, it was as large, ghastly, and gas-guzzling as the Hummer H3, on which it was based. The “mid-size” pickup was available only from 2009 to 2010 (Hummer went defunct in 2010, after being founded in 1992). The H3T featured a 5-foot bed with built-in storage boxes, and different trims such as the H3T Adventure, H3T Luxury, and H3T Alpha. Motor Trend gave it a test and said it crawled over things well, but wasn’t great at cruising on the highway.

10. 1935-1942 Plymouth PT-50

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via RM Sotheby's

Plymouth wasn’t known for their trucks, but the company did build a half-ton truck called the PT-50 from 1935-1942, and frankly, it was beautiful. Plymouth was a division of Chrysler, started in 1928, which shut down in 2001. It did dabble in trucks with the Trail Duster car-pick in the mid ‘70s, but this PT-50 is a much nicer model, and an L-head six engine that put out 70 hp. Nearly 11,000 were built and sold in 1937 alone.

9. 2007-2009 Sterling Bullet

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Pinterest

Sterling Trucks was a car company that was founded way back in 1906, then it went defunct in 1953. It was founded again in 1997 and went belly-up gain in 2009. The Bullet was one of their trucks based on the third-gen Dodge Ram 4500/5500 platform. It was a big class 4 and 5 truck manufactured from 2007 to 2009. Sterling was a division of Freightliner LLC, which was owned by Daimler Chrysler.

8. 1961-1968 International C-Series

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Classic Cars

The International C-Series was a series of pickup trucks built by International Harvester from 1961 to 1968. They were often used as utility fire trucks, and they succeeded the earlier B-Series range. Many were built as personal light-duty pickups, such as the Travelette crew cab. After 1965, the series became known as the D-Series, and in the last year (1968) the trucks had the option of AMC’s 232 cu-in inline-six engine.

7. 1969-1975 International Light Line

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Wikipedia

Shortly after the demise of the C-Series, the Light Line pickups were built from 1969-1975 by International Harvester. Also known as the D-Series, these pickups came in 2-door and 4-door crew cab pickup (Travelette) body styles. The truck was also available as a bare chassis for special purpose applications. After production ended in ’75, International chose to focus on the Scout and heavier machinery, opting not to replace the truck line. The company itself went defunct in 1985, after being founded in 1902.

6. 1946-1947 Hudson Big Boy

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via My Dream Car

Times Colonist writer Bill Vance said that “Hudson broke the mould in design of pickup trucks,” after introducing the beautiful Hudson pickup in 1946. Before then, the Hudson Motor Car Company (founded in 1909) built the “Big Boy” pickup before WWII, in 1942. The 1946 truck wasn’t called the Big Boy, but it was basically the same. Hudson built light trucks for almost 20 years, but never in large numbers, and this beautiful piece of machinery is quite rare today. Hudson flopped in 1954.

5. 1955-1960 Studebaker E-Series

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Pinterest

The Studebaker E-Series was a truck series sold in half-ton, ¾-ton, 1-ton, 1.5-ton, and 2-ton capabilities. The trucks were all fairly similar, but looked quite nice and modern for the time period. Between 1957-58, all Studebaker trucks were called Transtar. Studebaker was a popular American car manufacturer that started waaay back in 1852, and closed operations in 1967, after 115 years! They merged in 1954 with Packard, and Studebaker-Packard still have many abandoned factories littering the United States to this day.

4. 1957-1970 Prince Miler

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Pinterest

This is a little confusing, because the Prince Miler truck was built after the Prince Motor Company was absorbed into Nissan, but it was still called the Nissan Prince Miler after the 1967 merger. From 1957-67, the Miler was either a 1.25-ton or 1.5-ton truck, a dropside bed version, or even a 4-door, 6-seater light van. Japanese manufacturer Prince was founded in 1947 or 1952, depending on who you ask, until its merger with Nissan in 1966. (At one point, the Prince Skyline was even a thing!)

3. 1966-1973 Kaiser Jeepster Commando

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Wikipedia

The Jeepster Commando was a truck built by Kaiser Jeep from 1966 to 1973, to compete with the International Scout, Toyota Land Cruiser, and Ford Bronco. The pickup was also available as a wagon and roadster (convertible truck). It was replaced by the Jeep Cherokee in 1973. Kaiser Jeep was the result of a merger between Kaiser Motors and the Willys-Overland Company, formed in 1953 and phased out in 1970. Previously, the Jeepster had been produced by Willys-Overland from 1948-1950.

2. 1930-1931 Willys-Six C-113

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Proxibid

Speaking of Willys-Overland, a company most known for their military Jeeps, we have the Willys-Six C-113 pickup truck. The C-113’s name was in observation of its wheelbase in inches. It wasn’t a sales success, with only 198 units in total being built, but it looked cool! And it’s very rare. The vehicle was picked up by International Harvester, who installed their own 213 cu-in engine and offered it in 1933 as the International D-1. Willys was a company from 1908 to 1963, before becoming its successor, Kaiser Jeep.

1. 1915-1953 REO Speed Wagon

15 Pickup Trucks From Defunct Manufacturers You Forgot About

via Mecum Auctions

We’d be remiss not to mention the REO Speed Wagon—yes, the very truck that the rock band of the same name is based on (stylized as Speedwagon). The light motor truck was built from 1915 to 1953 and is considered an ancestor to the pickup truck. It made REO (named after its founder, Ransom Eli Olds) into one of the better-known manufacturers of commercial vehicles in America prior to WWII. The REO Motor Car Company was founded in 1905 and closed operations in 1967.

References: howstuffworks.com, aaca.org, timescolonist.com, Wikipedia.org