Technology

Pop-ups are frequent: users wonder if iOS 16 clipboard permissions prompt is buggy

Over time, TheVerge editor Chris Welch has been generally pleased with the iOS 16 update. The customizable lock screen experience, for example, is quite fun, and the portrait keying feature to remove backgrounds is quite nice. A few days into the new software, however, he ran into another major setback -- iOS 16's permission prompts are too strict when it comes to copying and pasting information between apps.

Pop-ups are frequent: users wonder if iOS 16 clipboard permissions prompt is buggy

(Photo by: TheVerge / Chris Welch)

It is not difficult to understand the original design of this pop-up reminder, after all, from the iPhone clipboard often contains account secrets, private photos and other sensitive data.

Apple is clearly aware of the problem of frequent access to clipboard information in some apps and wants to enhance the privacy experience in its own ecosystem with this move.

But the frequent pop-up prompts in a short period of time inevitably have a negative impact on the actual user experience.

For example, if you take an image subject from a photo and paste it into the Messenger messaging app, the sudden 'Do you allow paste' prompt disrupts what should be a seamless user process.

In addition, the same permission dialogs bombard the user experience when pasting certain content into Notes sticky notes.

Pop-ups are frequent: users wonder if iOS 16 clipboard permissions prompt is buggy

The intent to prevent apps from snooping on the clipboard is a pretty reasonable thing to do. But for such clear user intent, Apple's software development team apparently got lazy in implementing the "one-size-fits-all" policy.

Chris Welch even suspects that there is a bug in the software (rather than the expected behavior), such as the window not appearing at all when pasted into Slack.

Hopefully, as iOS 16 continues to be optimized (16.1 Beta 1 remains unchanged), the development team will build on the existing binary choice (allow/disallow) to provide a new "always allow" option for users who need to do this frequently.

After all, the company has long offered licensing options for geolocation information, notifications, background data and other application permissions before that.