Science

U.S. studies decline in harmful substances in the atmosphere Antarctic ozone hole expected to be repaired

U.S. studies decline in harmful substances in the atmosphere Antarctic ozone hole expected to be repaired

The earth's ozone layer is the first line of defense against ultraviolet radiation, however, emissions of harmful industrial substances have severely damaged the ozone barrier. Recently, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) found that the concentration of harmful chemicals in the middle stratosphere that affect the ozone layer has dropped by more than 50% compared to the 1980s. At this pace it is expected to repair the hole in the Antarctic ozone layer in 2070.

According to foreign media reports, a few days ago NOAA said the ozone layer is an area in the Earth's stratosphere that absorbs most of the sun's ultraviolet radiation, protecting the Earth's plants and animals from harmful rays. Without ozone, intense UV-B and UV-A radiation can cause skin cancer, sunburn and even reduce crop yields. Yet because of industrial gas emissions, large amounts of harmful chemicals have destroyed the ozone layer and created a large hole above the Antarctic continent, exacerbating the rate of iceberg melting and the problem of rising sea levels.

Fortunately, since humans have become aware of the problem, they have slowly taken action, and a recent NOAA study found that concentrations of harmful chemicals that damage the ozone layer have declined by at least 50% compared to concentrations in the middle stratosphere in the 1980s. The Copernicus Bureau of Atmospheric Surveillance used 3-D technology to monitor the Antarctic breach, Director Page (revealed that the data for September this year are within the average range, the next few weeks will pay closer attention to prevent other problems occur. Scientists said that if the concentration continues to decline, it is expected to restore the Antarctic ozone layer hole in 2070.