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Windows 10's November Update Isn't Done Breaking Stuff

Windows 10's November Update Isn't Done Breaking Stuff

It's been well-documented that Windows 10 has been having a pretty disastrous run as of late. Its November update, despite being a tiny file, has continued to cause havoc. Here's what you need to know.

Windows 10's November Update Isn't Done Breaking Stuff

We regret to inform you that the latest Windows 10 updates continue to be downright pests. This time, there are reports of some users receiving the rightfully ominous-sounding, Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) after updating. Here's what you should do.

Windows 10's latest update, 1909 or KB4517245, has been in the wild since 12 November and was initially noted as being a tiny update at just 180KB. But don't let its small size fool you - users have reported issues regarding one of the OS' most important features: Windows File Explorer.

In a Microsoft community post, a user reported issues with the search bar in File Explorer on 13 November. Since then, a number of users have complained of similar issues with File Explorer's functionality.

One user posted "something is not right with the top right search in File Explorer" while another said "Windows file explorer is a mess. Even here in this window, I can't cut/paste/move a single thing."

If Microsoft acknowledges the bug and works to offer a fix, it would be yet another one to add to the tally in recent months.

This is getting ridiculous

We hear you. To recap, here's Windows 10's cooked update timeline.

  • September's KB4512941 update causes a major Cortana issue.
  • An update to fix the Cortana bug, KB4515384, then causes issues with Window's Start menu, calendar feature and Action Centre.
  • Another September update, KB4052623, breaks Windows Defender.
  • More troubles for October's KB4524147 and KB4517211 updates, including boot and Start menu issues.
  • October's KB4517389 causes the Blue Screen of Death for some users.
  • November update, KB4517245, breaks Windows File Explorer.

Okay, what should I do?

While it's never advisable to uninstall recent updates because of the security patches that are often built into them, if the File Explorer bug is affecting you it's fine to uninstall this one for now. You won't really miss out on any cool, new features — you'll just be able to use the File Explorer like it was intended.

To do that, open up your Control Panel and click on the Add or remove programs button and select Programs and Features. Once you've done that, select View installed updates on the left-hand panel, look for the KB4517245 update, right click and select Uninstall. Keep an eye out on Windows Update's Twitter page for bug issues or check back on the Windows 10 update history page in the coming days and weeks to see if they've addressed it.

Windows 10's November Update Isn't Done Breaking Stuff

While we all like to think we're reasonably vigilant with security on our devices, we tend to be lulled into a false sense of security if we haven't been affected for a while. So here's something that should snap you back to attentive: A new cyberworm, called BlueKeep, is shaping up to be one of the worst mass cyber attacks since WannaCry. Yikes.